For the letter D, I am featuring a Villanelle by Dylan Thomas. A Villanelle is a 19-line poem with two rhymes and two refrains used in a strict manner. There are five stanzas of 3 lines each and one of 4. The first line and the third line of the first stanza are repeated multiple times throughout the poem. It follows an aba rhyming scheme. I am not doing a thorough job of explaining all the rules of the form. So, you can learn more about the structure of the Villanelle here. The Villanelle by Dylan Thomas is definitely one of the most famous ones, and the refrains are so powerful that they will stay with you long after you have read them.

Do not go gentle into that good night

Dylan Thomas,Β 1914Β –Β 1953

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Source: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/do-not-go-gentle-good-night

And this is my inspired poem, in a similar vein but a lot of me infused into it. I did not think I would enjoy putting my thoughts into such a restrictive structural form, but I have had the most fun in creating this piece. Before you read the poem, think about this: Have you ever had an ultimate dream? Like a ‘dream’ dream?

Wake up! Wake up to your dream dream

Wake up! Wake up to your dream dream
Write the lyrics to your life’s theme song
Life, a kanjeevaram weave of your thought beam

Believe! Believe in your gargantuan schemes
Put on your blinders! Don’t ping pong
Wake up! Wake up to your dream dream

You can conquer a sequined moonbeam
You can be your passion’s Neil Armstrong
Life, a kanjeevaram weave of your thought beam

Flaunt your gratitude like the sunbeam
Happiness will cannonball along
Wake up! Wake up to your dream dream

Belong! Belong always to your heart’s team
Rewrite your sense of right and wrong
Life, a kanjeevaram weave of your thought beam

Solid holograms from luminiscent streams
birthed by faith held strong
Wake up! Wake up to your dream dream
Life, a kanjeevaram weave of your thought beam

– Namratha Vardharajan


What is biggest i-don’t-think-that-can-ever-happen dream?

Share them with me today.

Mine is to write exquisite poetry and make a living out of it!

Far-fetched, huh?Β 

Afterall, I am a dreamer.

D for Dylan Thomas, poem: Wake up #AtoZChallenge #BlogchatterA2Z #NaPoWriMo
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34 thoughts on “D for Dylan Thomas, poem: Wake up #AtoZChallenge #BlogchatterA2Z #NaPoWriMo

  • April 12, 2019 at 1:20 am
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    Nice lines: “Flaunt your gratitude like the sunbeam
    Happiness will cannonball along”

    Reply
  • April 9, 2019 at 10:27 pm
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    Your poem was beautiful and very powerful. Varad led me here (we’re both fans of each others blogs) and I’m glad he did.

    I used the same Dylan Thomas poem as my jumping off point for my G post. A very different take than yours, to be sure. πŸ™‚

    Stuart
    Tale Spinning
    https://stuartnager.wordpress.com/

    Reply
    • April 9, 2019 at 10:48 pm
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      Thank you Stuart. Hopping over to your blog.

      Reply
  • April 8, 2019 at 6:13 am
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    I particularly love ‘don’t ping pong’. I looked up ‘kanjeevaram’ but a footnote wouldn’t have hurt.

    Reply
    • April 8, 2019 at 8:49 am
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      Will definitely add one! Thank you for the idea

      Reply
  • April 6, 2019 at 11:12 pm
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    A very inspiring dream…and poem. I especially liked your interesting word choices and the fact that you made me look up “kanjeevaram”. Thanks for linking up with dVerse!

    Reply
    • April 6, 2019 at 11:32 pm
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      Thank you Mish. Glad you liked it:)

      Reply
  • April 5, 2019 at 12:05 am
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    I’m very impressed – tackling the villanelle form is challenging in itself. And so having your poem be such a lovely example is definitely cheer worthy.

    Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 11:40 pm
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    This was beautiful. Especially the kanjeevaram part – so evocative because I could exactly imagine what you mean.

    Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 6:50 pm
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    I was able to understand the theme and essence behind your poem but I had some doubts about whether I have understood Dylan Thomas’ poem clearly though it broadly made sense. I can see that the structuring is totally similar.

    Reply
    • April 4, 2019 at 8:47 pm
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      If you wish to discuss offline on the Dylan Thomas poem I will be happy to compare thoughts

      Reply
      • April 5, 2019 at 1:50 pm
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        Does Dylan’s poem effectively say something like:

        Human beings should live their lives effectively and lives should have a meaning. Weshould live the kind of life that we ache to live more and a better life. The line

        ‘Do not go gentle into that good night.’

        seems to suggest that the poet is effectively telling us that an empty life is a wasted life and lives should be lived in such a way that we do not fade away gently into the night. And as regards the last paragraph I am even more confused. Here it is.

        And you, my father, there on the sad height,
        Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
        Do not go gentle into that good night.
        Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

        Who is the poet referring to when he addresses father in this stanza? Is it Christ or God because in the second line he says he is praying but that may not mean anything? I think I am missing something about the context here.

        Reply
        • April 5, 2019 at 11:49 pm
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          The poem is popularly thought to be to encourage his father to fight to live despite old age and illness until his last breath. That is why he references his father o the poem.

          For me personally I got a message similar to what you have interpreted: Live life to the fullest, never give up on life under any circumstances. Even when the going gets touch, fight to live and live the best possible life you can.

          Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 4:36 pm
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    Someday you are going to be a famous poet earning enough money to sustain a livelihood. And that’s the dream I have for myself too. A writer who can survive being in the same profession. May our dreams come true.

    Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 2:32 pm
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    Loved the Villanelle! The imagery is lovely. And my dream would be similar to yours – write poetry while travelling the world(or at least live in a picturesque place) πŸ˜€

    Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 7:43 am
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    I loved your take on poetry. Dream big! My biggest dream is to become a published author. Hope that happens some day. πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • April 4, 2019 at 11:26 am
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      You will. Definitely dream big and you will

      Reply
    • April 4, 2019 at 11:51 pm
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      Thank you Jade. Dverse is a wonderful poetry community. I have lost touch since I was not very active online in the past few months. Thank you for reminding. I have linked up:)

      Reply
      • April 16, 2019 at 8:53 pm
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        Thank you for linking up at dVerse. I love this response to the classic Dylan Thomas poem – it’s joyful and powerful and full of energy. You use the repetition beautifully – a great exhortation to dream and to pursue those dreams.

        Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 12:11 am
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    Brilliant imagery here, Namy. Loved it and the source poem.

    Reply
    • April 4, 2019 at 11:51 pm
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      Thank you Varad. Happy you liked it:)

      Reply

I would love to know your thoughts! Speak to me

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