When I was a little girl, I often accompanied my mother to the daily fruit and vegetable market in 8th Cross, Malleswaram(Bangalore residents will know what I am talking about). Vendors sat in makeshift shops made of a combination of bamboo and dried coconut leaves, on either side of this ever-so-narrow gully hawking their wares in their loudest voices. Green leafy bunches of Palak, mounds of onion and potatoes piled up threatening to spill out at any moment, tomatoes spilled over and squashed and stepped on painting the path red, offerings of free bunches of coriander and curry leaves to entice the customers, as the smell of fruit in various stages of ripening and decay surrounded our senses,  were all part of the experience of our weekly visit to this market.

Fast-forward today. I buy online, basically due to convenience. Dehydrated blueberries and kiwi, imported apples, califoria red grapes and organic strawberries do make it to my grocery list sometimes. However, it does strike me that none of these items are grown anywhere near us, not even in our country. True, it is readily available to us now. Neither am I averse to change nor globalization. I love a creamy pasta with bechamel sauce or an indulgent tiramisu but I do believe we do not give due importance to the food locally available.

Heard of turmeric latte? Currently, it is heralded as ‘Golden milk’, and sold at premium prices at coffee shops abroad including Starbucks. Yes, it is nothing but ‘manjal paal‘ or ‘haldi ka doodh‘ which your grandmother gave you to soothe that achy throat. Have you tried this? Search for ‘yoga exercises’ on youtube. The number of foreigners teaching yoga online greatly outnumbers the Indians. I am merely citing these examples to drive home the point that we do not realize the worth of our practices until it is adopted by the West.

Circling back, I am here to remind myself and urge you to buy and eat food grown locally.

Here are the top reasons why you should “Buy Local, Eat Local”.

 

However, it is heartening to note, the increase in the number of people are going back to their roots. Awareness is also on the rise: Organic farming, terrace gardening, cold pressed oil, millets are all buzzwords of today. Here, I bring you the story of an entrepreneur who is the embodiment of going back to his roots and his brainchild “Organic Mandya”.

 

Organic Mandya

The story behind Organic Mandya

Madhu Chandran is the founder of Organic Mandya. He was a software professional in California. Two things about his hometown dawned on him when he made frequent trips for work to Bangalore. Firstly, the farmers weren’t getting their due and hence the next generation from his town was migrating to the cities. Farmer suicides were a common occurrence. Secondly, there were a lot of chemicals being used in farming. He decided it was up to him to solve these problems, moved his family back to India and founded Organic Mandya.

What they do:

In one sentence, 'Organic Mandya connects farmers to consumers for the mutual benefit of both' Click To Tweet

Programs for the farmers

  • Educate farmers about organic farming practices and techniques for healthier and better yield of crops. This is achieved through free workshops and organic farmer clubs in each village. Currently, there are clubs in 120+ villages.
  • Women’s kitchen associations where they empower women to start a kitchen garden and also create and sell various organic products from their own homes.
  • Buy organic produce from the farmers and sell it to the consumers. This helps the farmer get better returns on their crops as there are no middlemen involved.

Programs for the City-dwellers

They offer the urban population various ways to  tread in the shoes of a farmer called ‘Organic Tourism’ with out-of-the-box initiatives like:

  • Sweat donation’ or what I would call “Farmer for a day” where you get to volunteer to work on a real farm(maybe one in need of labor) for a whole day.
  • ‘Farm stay’ where you and your family get to stay and experience the village life in the home of a farmer
  • ‘Farm share’ where you get to rent a piece of land which the farmer the farms for you. You can go visit the land and utilize the crops grown in it.
  • ‘Team@Farm’ in which you can go along with your office teammates for a day out on their farms.
  • ‘Organic Kids’ in which your children get to connect with nature. Ideal for school outings.
  • ‘Training in Organic Farming’: Want to start your own terrace garden? They have a training for that too.

Organic Mandya products are now available on ‘Amazon’. Do look it up.

In conclusion, I would like to say that it is up to us as consumers to support such organizations that improve the quality of the food that we consume, our vital force for a healthy life.

Have you heard of any other organizations like Organic Mandya?


This article is written as part of #SuperBloggerChallenge2018, conducted by HealthwealthbridgeFashionableFoodz and Allaboutthewoman. It should not be repurposed, republished or used otherwise. The content herein is owned by the blogger. SuperBloggerChallenge2018is not responsible for any kind of infringement caused. This article is based on one of the prompts given by India´s leading celebrity chefs, Vicky Ratnani for Week 3:´Getting maximal local in terms of food and menu offerings´. Thank you for the inspirational prompts!

Organic Mandya: Buy Local, Support Farmers #SuperBloggerChallenge2018 #Instacuppa
Tagged on:         

19 thoughts on “Organic Mandya: Buy Local, Support Farmers #SuperBloggerChallenge2018 #Instacuppa

  • March 6, 2018 at 11:54 pm
    Permalink

    Andd its a wonderful concept! great work. Keep it up.
    #Superbloggerchallenge2018 #Instacuppa

    Reply
  • March 6, 2018 at 1:19 pm
    Permalink

    I so agree with you! I loved the organic mandya concept, it is the perfect example of look local and think global. More power to organic mandya

    Reply
  • March 6, 2018 at 12:36 pm
    Permalink

    With the corporate driven modern world running towards more and more quick fixes in almost everything, it is imperative that we take a step back and go down to the basics. Because of the demand, and the resulting greed most of the products available in the shops these days are not natural. From the artificially ripened mangoes, the machine whitened rice, to the extra-color added strawberries, tomatoes and apples, we are consuming a plethora of fruits and vegetables that are not good to our systems. That’s where organizations like Organic Mandya strive to make a difference. If you have the time and space, grow what you need in your own home garden. Otherwise, why don’t you support organizations like Organic Mandya? Nicely written article, Namy.

    Reply
  • March 6, 2018 at 12:03 pm
    Permalink

    What a wonderful concept is Organic Mandya. I would surely check their product. And I am so agree with you that our own local recipes are being sold with some exotic names in today’s expensive food joints. Love that para of turmeric latte.

    Reply
  • March 5, 2018 at 9:52 am
    Permalink

    Wow! Organic Mandya looks like and extremely thoughtful initiative to get farmers their dues for producing good food that we will eat. I hope more people take similar initiatives to encourage farmers grow organic food and get them their deserved dues.

    Reply
    • March 6, 2018 at 12:29 pm
      Permalink

      It is a wonderful idea whose execution also seems to be good.

      Reply
  • March 5, 2018 at 7:11 am
    Permalink

    Such a well researched write-up! Yes, I found it funny when the golden latte took on a rage while at home it is simply what I give my children when they are ill. Love the women’s kitchen associations idea and organic tourism is something to think about. Kudos for a beautifully penning this one👏

    Reply
  • March 5, 2018 at 12:54 am
    Permalink

    Such a wonderful and informative article Namrata, I really enjoyed reading it. I will check out Organic Mandya, it seems to be quite interesting.
    #SuperBloggerChallenge2018 #Instacuppa

    Reply
  • March 4, 2018 at 11:19 pm
    Permalink

    I have thoroughly enjoyed reading your post.. You have highlighted very important aspects in ur impressive writing.
    Two things that caught my attention, first is your description of the local market and second one obviously Organic Mandya. Great initiative.

    Pls read my week3 post for #superbloggerchallenge2018 #instacuppa
    https://www.talestotell.co.in/single-post/2018/03/03/FOODPORN-BY-THE-SOCIAL-JUNKIE-Superbloggerchallenge2018-instacuppa

    Reply
  • March 4, 2018 at 4:11 pm
    Permalink

    Nice write up. I loved the concept of “A farmer for a day”. A very unique concept which I would love to try once.

    Reply
    • March 4, 2018 at 4:32 pm
      Permalink

      Thank you Snehal😊 Would love to be ‘a farmer for a day’ too. If possible one day every month just to reconnect with nature, get my hands into the earth and do something productive

      Reply
  • March 4, 2018 at 4:06 pm
    Permalink

    Definitely great work by Madhu Chandran. It’s teally upto is how we can help our farmers. Lovely write up Namrata 🙂 #SuperBloggerChallenge2018

    Reply
  • March 3, 2018 at 11:34 pm
    Permalink

    Great work by Madhu Chandran. Wonderful to hear about his efforts to educate farmers. Organic Mandya seems to be doing a great job. Thanks for bringing us this wonderful effort by a man committed to farmers welfare.

    Reply
    • March 4, 2018 at 4:35 pm
      Permalink

      He and his team are doing some really hands on work and a significant contribution to our farmers and society

      Reply
    • March 3, 2018 at 9:22 pm
      Permalink

      Thank you for your visit and comment Tina😊 Do check out their website and offerings if you stay in Karnataka. They have a collective farmers market also on Mandya Highway.

      Reply
  • March 3, 2018 at 2:19 pm
    Permalink

    Interesting and educating read. Kudos to the people who are thinking of connecting back to roots.
    #superbloggerchallenge2018

    Reply

I would love to know your thoughts! Speak to me

Follow

Get the latest posts delivered to your mailbox:

%d bloggers like this: